Hidden waterways and daylighting

Hidden Rivers thumbnailI worked as a commissioned artist on this strand of the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded Towards hydrocitizenship. Connecting communities with and through interdependent multiple water issues (2014-2017). This project took an innovative and multidisciplinary approach to intergenerational arts-based research and my role was engage communities in creative conversations about water.

For a full account of Hidden waterways and daylighting and the three other research strands of the project you can click onto the Water City Bristol website here.                                                https://www.watercitybristol.org/hidden-rivers-and-daylighting.html               I co-authored two papers about my work on the project:
2020 ‘Reweaving urban water-community relations: creative, participatory river ‘daylighting’ and local hydrocitizenship’ with Lindsey McEwen, Iain Biggs and Katherine Phillips in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.   Here is a link to the paper                                                             2019 ‘Voicing waters: (co-)creative reflections on sound, water, conversations and hydrocitizenship’ with Owain Jones and Antony Lyons in Doughty, K.; Duffy, M. & Harada, T. (Eds), Elgar.   Here is a link to the book

I have also made an interactive account of the project that you can visit here.

Below are some of the younger participants’ maps and notebooks, and some of the older people’s stories illustrated by me, and a snippet of conversation where we talked about how it might be if the river was daylighted.
Sue: Is it possible?
Jenny: Wildlife would come back, but you refresh it and get it all lovely and then they come along and dump things there.
Sue: A couple of crafty cameras to catch people. It’s disgusting if you go down Dundry way.
Jenny: It couldn’t happen with all the cutbacks, but it shouldn’t be because it’s our environment, our mental health…

Sue: We’d get shrimping nets and jam jars like when the kids were little…
Beryl: I’d like it – would you? I’d like it.
Sue: I’d like it too. The other night I sat by Keynsham. They had picnic table and that. I sat with a nice Pimms by the river.
Mina: My daughter’s near the Malago
Linda: When the Malago was flooded –
Jean: Oh no, don’t talk about that!

7. Tin bath
20. British Road - Everything floating around
18. Greenway Bush Lane - Penny for the ferry
Maria
Myla
Vikram
notations
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planning-map-2
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